Nearly half of the states have measures in place for visitors, from testing to quarantine requirements.

This list was updated Jan. 27 and is updated weekly as states continue to announce changes to their travel advisories. Are we missing any changes? Email us at travelrestrictions@nytimes.com.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue to ask people to avoid traveling to minimize the chance they will expose themselves or others to the coronavirus. For those who do travel, the C.D.C. ask that they get a viral test one to three days before their departure, and again three to five days after their return. Even with a negative test, travelers are advised to stay home and avoid nonessential activities for a week upon their return. People who don’t get tested should extend that to 10 days, and both groups should avoid others at high risk for 14 days.

The C.D.C. offer two useful tools online to help vacationers plan their trips. One site links to state and local restrictions by ZIP code. The other includes a color-coded map of the infection rate by state, so people can easily see how prevalent the virus is at their destination.

Travelers should remember to keep their guard up and use safety precautions when away from home: wear a face mask in public, avoid large gatherings and stay at least six feet from others, wash hands frequently and keep hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol in close reach, avoid touching your face, cover coughs and sneezes, and use drive-through service and curbside pickup at restaurants and stores. When overnighting, plan ahead for safety at a hotel or when staying with family or friends.

Here is a summary of current restrictions in the United States for leisure travelers, although many states do not apply them to those staying for less than 24 hours. Some municipalities or counties may have more stringent regulations. There are generally exemptions for essential workers who are on the job, including health care workers, members of the military and others, but even they may be subject to some restrictions. Visits for medical care or study are considered essential in some states, but not in others.

Restrictions for Guam can be found in our companion story on international destinations that have reopened to American citizens.
Alabama

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Alabama.
Alaska

All nonresidents over the age of 10 must upload proof of a negative molecular-based SARS-CoV-2 test in the previous 72 hours to an online travel portal, where they can also submit a travel declaration and self-isolation plan. Those who were tested before departure and are awaiting their results must quarantine until proof of a negative finding can be uploaded. Visitors arriving without a test can get one for $250, but must self-quarantine while awaiting results, which may take three days or more. The state requests travelers get a second test done five to 14 days after arrival.

Alaska residents may be tested for free, or they can quarantine for two weeks at their own cost.

Those who tested positive for the virus in the previous 90 days, and have documentation they have recovered, are exempt from testing.
Arizona

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Arizona.
Arkansas

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Arkansas.
California

People from out of state are discouraged from visiting, and Californians are asked to avoid nonessential travel that would take them more than 120 miles from their own homes. Those arriving in or returning to California from other states or countries are asked to self-quarantine for 10 days.

The state recommends that visitors call ahead to learn if any regional or local restrictions are in place. The cities of San Francisco and Los Angeles have mandatory 10-day quarantines for those coming from outside their regions, and Los Angeles is requiring all travelers over the age of 16 who are entering the city from another state or country to complete a form acknowledging that they have read and understood California’s travel advisory. The online form must be submitted before arrival or when landing at Los Angeles International Airport, Van Nuys Airport or Union Station. Failure to comply is punishable by a fine of up to $500.
Colorado

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions, however Coloradans are discouraged from nonessential travel.
Connecticut

People arriving from a state, territory or country other than New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island, or from outside the United States, must self-quarantine for 10 days and fill out a mandatory health form if they plan to stay in Connecticut for more than 24 hours. Travelers can avoid or shorten the quarantine period by providing proof of a negative test (not an antibody test) taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. A test can also be taken after arriving, but the traveler must remain in isolation until written proof of the negative result is provided to the Commissioner of Public Health by email at DPH.COVID-Travel@ct.gov or by fax at (860) 326-0529. Those who tested positive for the virus more than 10 days but less than 90 days prior and who have recovered are not required to quarantine if proof of their positive test is provided by email or fax.

Failure to comply with the order carries a fine of up to $500 per violation.
Delaware

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Delaware.
District of Columbia

Anyone visiting for more than 24 hours from a high-risk area must get a negative coronavirus test no more than 72 hours before their arrival. If they are staying in Washington for more than three days, they must have another test done three to five days after arriving.

The order excludes travelers from Maryland and Virginia because of their relationship with the district, but it applies to any jurisdiction with more than 10 positive cases per 100,000 people per day. The government of the District of Columbia isn’t providing a list of regions meeting the threshold, but an interactive map put together by The New York Times provides that information on a county-by-county basis.
Florida

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Florida.
Georgia

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Georgia.
Hawaii

Travelers wishing to bypass the 10-day mandatory quarantine on the islands of Hawaii, Oahu and Maui must have a negative Nucleic Acid Amplification result from an approved testing site that was taken within 72 hours of the final leg of the trip. Those age 5 and older without a test or with pending test results must quarantine, and test results will not be accepted once the traveler is in Hawaii. The results must either be uploaded online into a mandatory health form or travelers can bring a hard copy when boarding their flight.

The island of Kauai requires a 10-day quarantine for those arriving from another state regardless of the preflight testing. However, the period can be shortened with a “resort bubble” policy that allows travelers at certain hotels to move about the grounds, and then take a virus test on the third day. If the test is negative, the visitor is released from quarantine.

In addition to the pre-travel test for trans-Pacific passengers, some counties mandate a second test. The county of Hawaii is randomly testing at least 25 percent of arriving passengers at the airport at no charge. Maui and Kauai counties are requesting another free voluntary test 72 hours after arrival.

For those island hopping, there are also testing requirements for traveling from one county to another. People entering Hawaii county can either have a pretest 72 hours before arrival, or be tested after entering the county and quarantine until a negative result is received. Visitors to Maui and Kauai counties must have a pretest 72 hour before arrival, or quarantine for 10 days. Again, travelers are asked to take another free test 72 hours after arriving.
Idaho

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Idaho.
Illinois

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Illinois. However, under an emergency travel order, Chicago has implemented a two-tier color-coded system.

Travelers from 49 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico fall under an “orange” advisory, meaning they are asked to avoid travel, but those who do visit for nonessential reasons must either quarantine for 10 days or have a negative result from a Covid-19 test taken within 72 hours before their arrival. A copy of the result should be kept on hand while in Chicago. (Student who regularly commute fall under the rules for essential workers.)

Those from the only “yellow” state, Hawaii, are still discouraged from visiting, but may enter without restriction.

The list is updated every other Tuesday, with the next update expected on Feb. 10.
Indiana

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Indiana.
Iowa

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Iowa.
Kansas

A quarantine requirement applies to residents and visitors who participated in any out-of-state gathering that included 500 people or more where individuals did not wear masks and socially distance by six feet, and also to anyone who is returning from a cruise ship or river cruise. In some cases, the quarantine period is shorter for those with no symptoms who on the sixth day get a PCR test that comes back negative. They can leave on Day 8. Those with no symptoms who opt not to have a coronavirus test can leave on Day 11. States with a diagnosed virus rate three times that of Kansas may be added to a quarantine list. Local health departments may have other restrictions.
Kentucky

Out-of-state leisure travel is being discouraged. Those who do travel are asked to quarantine for 14 days when they enter Kentucky or follow C.D.C. guidance for alternate options to shorten the quarantine period.

Louisiana

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Louisiana.
Maine

Residents of New Hampshire and Vermont are allowed to enter the state without restriction. Everyone else must either self-quarantine for 10 days or the duration of their trip if it’s shorter, or sign a document stating that they had a negative result to a PCR or antigen coronavirus test within the previous 72 hours. Those with pending test results must quarantine until a negative result is received. The rule also applies to those taking a day trip out of state. Those in quarantine are allowed to leave their lodging only for limited outdoor activities, such as hiking, when no other people are around.

An exemption to the testing exists for those under the age of 18 who are traveling with adults who have a recent negative test. Maine residents who travel to a state not on the exempted list must also quarantine when they return or, alternatively, test negative for the virus.
Maryland

Those entering the state must either obtain a negative test in the 72 hours before arriving in Maryland or immediately upon arrival. Those without a negative result must self-quarantine for 10 days. The state encourages people to have a second test 72 hours after entering Maryland. Residents of Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C., are exempt because of their proximity to Maryland.

Those who violate the order could face up to a $5,000 fine and a possible sentence of up to year in prison.
Massachusetts

Except for commuters, travelers passing through and people coming from states with a lower coronavirus transmission rate, anyone over the age of 10 must either quarantine for 10 days or provide proof of a negative molecular (PCR) SARS-CoV2 test taken within the previous 72 hours. Those awaiting test results must quarantine until a negative result is received. All adults over the age of 18 (or a minor traveling alone) who enter Massachusetts must fill out a travel form.

The exemption currently applies only to those who were in Hawaii. Those who are recovered but who previously tested positive for the virus more than 10 days but less than 90 days before arrival do not need to obtain a negative pretest nor quarantine. They must have documentation of their positive PCR test result, including the date it was taken. Those who fail to comply with the rules face fines of up to $500 per day.
Michigan

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Michigan.
Minnesota

Out-of-state travel is “highly discouraged” and visitors and returning residents are asked to quarantine for 14 days when entering the state.
Mississippi

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Mississippi.
Missouri

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Missouri.
Montana

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Montana.
Nebraska

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Nebraska.
Nevada

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Nevada.
New Hampshire

Nonessential travel is discouraged. A 10-day self-quarantine is in effect for travelers or residents coming from an international destination, a cruise ship, or from any state other than Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut or Rhode Island. After seven days in quarantine, if asymptomatic, the traveler can get a PCR test; if it’s negative, they are free to go but must still watch for symptoms and socially distance.

Travelers are allowed to quarantine for 10 days in their home state, or quarantine for 7 days and then get a negative molecular test right before visiting, as long as they don’t take public transportation to get to New Hampshire.

No quarantine requirement is in effect for those who are fully vaccinated against the coronavirus and at least 14 days have passed since their second dose, or for those who had a positive result to a PCR or antigen test for the virus in the previous 90 days, but are no longer ill.
New Jersey

Nonessential travel is discouraged. Travelers and residents returning after 24 hours or more in any place other than New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Delaware are asked to get a coronavirus test one to three days before their trip, and then again three to five days after arriving in New Jersey. A seven-day quarantine is still recommended for those who receive a negative test result. If the result isn’t back or the person opted not to get tested, the state requests a quarantine period of 10 days.

Those who went beyond the immediate region should complete an online survey providing details about where they have been and where they plan to stay.

People who tested positive for the coronavirus in the previous three months and recovered do not need to quarantine or be tested again as long as they don’t have symptoms.
New Mexico

All travelers and residents not coming from a low-risk region must self-quarantine for 14 days. As of Jan. 13, the most recent update, no state met that threshold, so everyone arriving in the state, including international visitors, must quarantine.
New York

New York is allowing travelers the option of avoiding its mandatory 10-day quarantine with a series of tests and a shorter period of isolation.

Those who have been out of the state for 24 hours or more must be able to present a negative test taken in the three days before their arrival, and must quarantine for the first three days in New York. Another coronavirus test must be taken on the fourth day, and if it is negative, the person may leave quarantine. Those not wanting to take the tests must complete the full quarantine.

The guidance also applies to those coming from any U.S. territory and any international destination that is at the C.D.C.’s level 2 or higher risk assessment for Covid-19. States that are contiguous with New York are exempted from the quarantine protocol. People who left New York for less than 24 hours do not need to get a test before returning, nor do they need to quarantine. However, they must get a coronavirus test on their fourth day in the state.

Visitors must fill out a Health Department traveler form. Those who don’t comply with the coronavirus rules for travelers face a possible fine of up to $10,000.
North Carolina

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in North Carolina.
North Dakota

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in North Dakota. However, the state recommends following C.D.C. guidance for pre- and post-travel testing and reduced activities.
Ohio

Traveling Ohioans and out-of-state tourists who have visited an area of high risk, or who have had possible exposure to the coronavirus, are asked to voluntarily quarantine for 14 days.

As of Jan. 27, Ohio identified the following states as meeting the threshold to quarantine: Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Virginia. In addition, Connecticut, Kentucky, Oregon and Wyoming had reporting anomalies, so were not considered for the list.
Oklahoma

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Oklahoma. However, the state recommends following C.D.C. guidance to avoid nonessential travel.
Oregon

Oregon is urging visitors and returning residents to self-quarantine for 14 days. Oregonians are discouraged from traveling for nonessential reasons.
Pennsylvania

All domestic and international travelers over the age of 11 entering Pennsylvania, whether visitors or residents, must have proof of a negative coronavirus test in the 72 hours before entering the state, or they must quarantine for 10 days, or until a negative result can be produced. Those who fail to comply could be fined up to $300.
Puerto Rico

Visitors need to present a negative molecular test taken within 72 hours before arrival. Those awaiting test results, those arriving without a test and those arriving with symptoms must quarantine for 14 days or until a negative result is provided to the Puerto Rico Health Department. An online travel declaration form must also be completed. Curfews are in effect.
Rhode Island

Anyone visiting from a higher-risk state or from an international destination needs to quarantine for 14 days or provide proof of a negative result from a test taken within 72 hours before arrival. People who receive a negative test during their quarantine can stop, although the state recommends the full two-weeks. Visitors must also complete a certificate of compliance and an out-of-state travel screening form when they arrive in the state. The states identified on Jan. 27 as lower risk were Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oregon and Vermont.
South Carolina

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in South Carolina.
South Dakota

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in South Dakota. Some routes entering tribal lands are closed to the general public.
Tennessee

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Tennessee.
Texas

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Texas.
Utah

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Utah, though guidelines ask people reconsider nonessential travel to areas with widespread community transmission of the virus.
U.S. Virgin Islands

Visitors age 5 and older must have a negative coronavirus test taken within five days of arrival, or show a positive test for antibodies within the previous four months. The results should be submitted via a travel health form, and within 48 hours, a travel certification should be sent that is required to board a flight to the islands. The original test result and the travel certification must be presented upon arrival. Those who don’t have an acceptable test result must quarantine for 14 days at their own cost or the duration of their stay, whichever is shorter. They can also get out of quarantine by producing the needed test result.

A C.D.C. rule requires travelers into the United States to show proof of a negative test taken within 72 hours of boarding their flight does not apply to people going to or from the U.S. mainland and the U.S. territory.
Vermont

The state strongly advises against all but essential travel, even within the state. Returning residents as well as domestic and international visitors must quarantine for 14 days after being out of the state for a day trip or longer. Those without any coronavirus symptoms may get a PCR test on or after the seventh day of their quarantine. If the result is negative, they are free to resume their activities.

Those traveling to Vermont in a personal car (including a rental) or on a private plane may complete Vermont’s requirements in their home state and then, assuming they limit stops en route, enter Vermont without having to quarantine again.
Virginia

As of Jan. 27, there was no statewide quarantine.
Washington

Washington is urging visitors and returning residents to self-quarantine for 14 days. State residents are being discouraged from traveling for nonessential reasons. Those arriving from the United Kingdom, South Africa or any country that has the mutated form of the virus must quarantine for 14 days.
West Virginia

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in West Virginia.
Wisconsin

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions. However, the state’s Department of Health Services recommends Wisconsinites cancel or postpone all travel, including travel within the state.
Wyoming

As of Jan. 27, there were no statewide restrictions in Wyoming.

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